Lewis H B
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Lewis' Astronomy and Oil War One

Midway Baptist Astronomy club
My sad experiance is that
Secular Astronomy Associations like SDAA
dont tolerate Christian believers.....

 
I am currently using a 15x to 45x zoom spotting scope on a very wide camera tripod. It works nicely .
 
I have a Newtonian reflecting telescope (I am trying to sell)with an 8 inch mirror, an 8" f4.5.
This means it is very short, giveing a wide field of view. It is a "Dobsonian",
meaning it has a simple wood base. .... neck, back. knee pain forces sale.
 
I enjoy looking at the Moon, Planets, Galaxies and Double stars. Most
star systems have more than one sun, and many of these are visable from
Earth. The planets around other stars are too faint for us to see from Earth, but astronomers can detect them because the star "wobbles" due to the
gravitational effects on the star by the planets.
 
Dobsonian improvements  :)
After years of frustration I have figured out how to Smoothly move my Dob !!
For smooth altitude adjustments, I drilled two holes throuth the box holding the scope  just above the bottom of the box and ran a 2 foot long dowell through  the holes.  I tied a string onto the bottom of the scope and wound the string onto the dowell.  by turning the dowell rod, I slowly crank the base down and raise the elevation on the scope...
If I have to decrease elevation, I have an arm with a pulley above the base of the scope. i thread the string from the base of the scope through the pulley on the arm to the dowell and by turning the dowell smothly lower the scopes elevation....
For left or right adjustments, I drove lots of small nails in a 18" circle down into the scope base. I then screwed a large screw  one inch above the base horizontally  into the box holding the scope( that rotates on the base).... By useing a 12" flat screwdriver i can smoothly pry the scope box left or right.
                       
 
 
 
"Is the speed of light a constant?" 
Interestingly enough, every time it was measured over the next few hundred years, it seemed to be a little slower than before. This could be explained away, as the first measurements were unbelievably rough compared to the technical accuracy later.  It was not that simple, though.  When the same person did the same test using the same equipment at a later period in time, the speed was slower.  Not much, but slower. 
I enjoy looking at GOD's creation. It shows an awesome evidence of his majesty, wisdom and power. The expance of forever, uniquely showing himself to all mankind.
excerpt...
The speed of light has been measured 163 times by 16 different methods over the past 300 years. However, Australian physicist Barry Setterfield and mathematician Trevor Norman, reexamining the known experimental measurements to date, have suggested a highly controversial discovery: the speed of light appears to have been slowing down!
1657: Roemer     307,600.     +/- 5400 km/sec 1875: Harvard     299,921.     +/- 13 km/sec 1983: NBS (laser method):     299,792.4358      +/- 0.0003 km/sec
      The speed of light is now measured as 299,792.4358 kilometers per second.6 (This is approximately 186,000 miles/second; or one foot per nanosecond.)

       The Canadian mathematician, Alan Montgomery, has reported a computer analysis supporting the Setterfield/Norman results. His model indicates that the decay of velocity of light closely follows a cosecant-squared curve, and has been asymptotic since 1958. If he is correct, the speed of light was 10-30% faster in the time of Christ; twice as fast in the days of Solomon; four times as fast in the days of Abraham, and perhaps more than 10 million times faster prior to 3000 B.C.

http://www.khouse.org/articles/technical/20020701-423.html

Helen d setterfield

The following question was: "Is the speed of light constant?"  Interestingly enough, every time it was measured over the next few hundred years, it seemed to be a little slower than before. This could be explained away, as the first measurements were unbelievably rough compared to the technical accuracy later.  It was not that simple, though.  When the same person did the same test using the same equipment at a later period in time, the speed was slower.  Not much, but slower. 

  Barry Setterfield has done years of research in this area. His website is:
http://www.setterfield.org/

We have a study overviewing his discoveries, along with an interview with him, of which you can listen to large portions online:
http://www.khouse.org/6640/technical/BP078.html

Here's a news article on a group that independently came to the same conclusion - that light has been slowing down (God bless The Age for keeping archives):
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/08/07/1028157961167.html

Further links:
http://www.ldolphin.org/bowden.html
http://www.ldolphin.org/bowden/centj.html

 

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